Mental health problems are common in society.  The ultimate aim of this final year rotation in psychiatry is to prepare you to be able to effectively assess and manage the common problems that may be encountered by an intern and how to work as a member of a multidisciplinary team in helping people with mental illness.  As an added bonus we hope that your exposure to a multidisciplinary team aids you in the transition to intern where teamwork will be a key aspect of your role.

We recommend you work through these resources in order as you progress through your term.

We would like to thank the Hunter New England Psychiatry Trainee who helped contribute to these educational resources.

 

BLOG POSTS:

How to study psychiatry? Some recommendations.

A few tips on how to study psychiatry in your final year from the coordinator of final year psychiatry at University of Newcastle.

4 comments

Year 5 Psychiatry Orientation

An introduction to Year 5 Psychiatry at the Joint Medical Program

0 comments

 

Key Tasks this Week:

  1. Orientation and Induction
  2. Check in with your team and discuss your logbook
  3. Talk to some patients
  4. Review key components of psychiatric history
  5. Review Mental State Examination
  6. Review Mood Disorders
  7. Review Antidepressants and ECT

 

During your first week in your psychiatry rotation you should orientate yourself to your new team.  Discuss with your supervising consultant and registrars your learning goals.  Make sure you will be able to fulfil all the required tasks in your logbook.

There will be an orientation session at your respective clinical school site.

During your first week you will probably recall some of the previous lessons you have had in relation to psychiatry and mental health as well as some of the interactional skills training.  These will come in handy as you progress during your term.

During this first week we suggest you become comfortable with interviewing people with mental health problems.  Don’t worry too much about gathering information at this stage focus more on your style of questioning and eliciting key mental state findings.

There are a number of conditions in psychiatry.  As an intern you will not be expected to know about all of these, however, there are some major categories that you should be familiar with.

We suggest you review mood disorders, noting that in the DSM V Depressive Disorders and Bipolar Disorders are no separate categories.

 

Week 1 Practice OSCE

 

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Psychiatric History Taking

A primer on psychiatric history taking for medical students and junior medical officers

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Asking the difficult questions in psychiatry

For a number of reasons there are some topics or questions that we find less easy to ask of our patients.

0 comments

Mood Disorders: A rollercoaster of emotions

Dr Sarah Hutton discusses Mood Disorders. Its fairly simple when you break it into sad and happy (or is it)?

2 comments

Can you get Serotonin Syndrome from a Cough Medicine?

0 comments

Key Learning Tasks:

  1. Review Psychotic Disorders, in particular Schizophrenia
  2. Review Antipsychotic Medications, in particular their general mechanism of action and the types of side effects and safety issues
  3. Understand the Principle of Least Restrictive Care which underpins the majority of mental health legislation in the world
  4. Understand the two types of definitions of Mentally Ill and Mentally Disordered under the NSW Mental Health Act
  5. Practice “Formulating” your cases using the Biopsychosocial Model (this will help you in your presentations of cases)

 

During this week we recommend you review the psychotic disorders.  This will also enable you to review mental health ethics and the Mental Health Act.

 

Week 2 Practice Viva

 

BLOG POSTS:

The Mental Health Act

Keys aspects of the Mental Health Act for medical students and junior medical staff

0 comments

The Mental State Examination in Psychiatry

How to tackle phenomenology for the novice or intermediate learner

0 comments
psychosis

Psychosis

0 comments

 

Key Learning Tasks:

  1. Review the main anxiety disorders
  2. Try to interview at least one patient with an anxiety problem (hint about 80% patients with depression have an anxiety component)
  3. Review main treatments for anxiety disorders (e.g. psychological therapies & antidepressants, understand the limited role for benzodiazpines)
  4. Learn about mindfulness and sleep hygiene
  5. Practice presenting patients to members of your team

 

During this week we encourage you to review anxiety disorders and consider the role of psychological therapies and psychosocial treatments in the management of and recovery from mental illness.

 

 

PRACTICE CASE FOR WEEK 3

 

BLOG POSTS:

Anxiety: What’s the deal with it? Isn’t it normal to feel anxious?

In this blog Dr Sarah Hutton discusses the role that anxiety plays in everyone’s lives and when anxiety may become a problem.

0 comments

Psychological Therapies

Felicia Ng discusses the role of psychotherapies in psychiatry

0 comments

Key Learning Tasks:

  1. Complete the RANZCP eLearning module on interviewing an Aboriginal person (see blog post)
  2. If possible interview an Aboriginal person in relation to their mental health and well being
  3. Review Personality Disorders, in particular Borderline Personality Disorder and Antisocial Personality Disorder
  4. Review Eating Disorders
  5. Review Risk Assessment
  6. Interview someone with either a Personality Disorder or Eating Disorder and consider the acute and long term risk factors
  7. Practice documenting patients the way you will be expected to document when you are an Intern, for e.g. assist with completing a discharge summary or file note

This week the focus is on development and culture and mental health.  Please bear in mind that part of your examination will include an assessment of your understanding of the role of culture in mental illness.  We will be utilising Aboriginal culture as our basis of understanding the role of culture in mental health.

You should also review development and personality, as well as eating disorders and risk.

We are already halfway through our term and have covered quite a lot.

 

Week 4 Practice Viva

 

BLOG POSTS:

The Dance of Life by Helen Milroy

Culture & Psychiatry

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What is a personality disorder? The weird, the wild and the worried

Su Lynn Cheah discusses the main types of personality problems likely to be encountered by medical students as well as some interesting controversies.

0 comments

Communication in Psychiatry

Anthony discusses some of the important communications issues when working in Psychiatry

0 comments

Personality Disorders Part Deux: How to Assess, How to Manage

0 comments

 

Key Learning Tasks:

  1. Review cognitive testing and delirium (note that the majority of patients with delirium are “quietly” confused)
  2. Perform cognitive testing on at leat one patient, for e.g. the MMSE or the MiniCOG or the MOCA and discuss your findings with someone
  3. Review somatizing disorders
  4. Practice performing a handover for a variety of scenarios using one of the standard formats for e.g. ISBAR

This is our final week of new learning.  Next week will be a consolidation and preparation week.

The focus this week is on conditions that are more likely to be seen by interns in the general hospital or general practice setting.

 

PRACTICE CASE

 

BLOG POSTS:

doors

The Ds of Cognitive Impairment

Felicia Ng discusses the D’s of Cognitive Impairment (Delirium, Dementia and Depression) with a special emphasis on Delirium

0 comments

 

Congratulations on completing your Psychiatry Rotation.

We do hope that you have had a good experience and an opportunity to prepare yourself for internship next year.

Don’t forget to get your supervisor forms and logbooks completed and returned.

For those of you interested in knowing a bit more about what its like to be a psychiatrist here are a few links:

Psychiatry at NSW Health Map My Health Career

RANZCP: Why Choose Psychiatry as a Career?

Hunter New England JMO Training Page

BLOG POSTS:

How to study psychiatry? Some recommendations.

A few tips on how to study psychiatry in your final year from the coordinator of final year psychiatry at University of Newcastle.

4 comments

 

Categories

Please check back regularly for updates.

Introduction

Mental health problems are common in society.  The ultimate aim of this final year rotation in psychiatry is to prepare you to be able to effectively assess and manage the common problems that may be encountered by an intern and how to work as a member of a multidisciplinary team in helping people with mental illness.  As an added bonus we hope that your exposure to a multidisciplinary team aids you in the transition to intern where teamwork will be a key aspect of your role.

We recommend you work through these resources in order as you progress through your term.

We would like to thank the Hunter New England Psychiatry Trainee who helped contribute to these educational resources.

 

BLOG POSTS:

 

How to study psychiatry? Some recommendations.

A few tips on how to study psychiatry in your final year from the coordinator of final year psychiatry at University of Newcastle.

4 comments

Year 5 Psychiatry Orientation

An introduction to Year 5 Psychiatry at the Joint Medical Program

0 comments

 

 

Week 1

Key Tasks this Week:

  1. Orientation and Induction
  2. Check in with your team and discuss your logbook
  3. Talk to some patients
  4. Review key components of psychiatric history
  5. Review Mental State Examination
  6. Review Mood Disorders
  7. Review Antidepressants and ECT

During your first week in your psychiatry rotation you should orientate yourself to your new team.  Discuss with your supervising consultant and registrars your learning goals.  Make sure you will be able to fulfil all the required tasks in your logbook.

There will be an orientation session at your respective clinical school site.

During your first week you will probably recall some of the previous lessons you have had in relation to psychiatry and mental health as well as some of the interactional skills training.  These will come in handy as you progress during your term.

During this first week we suggest you become comfortable with interviewing people with mental health problems.  Don’t worry too much about gathering information at this stage focus more on your style of questioning and eliciting key mental state findings.

There are a number of conditions in psychiatry.  As an intern you will not be expected to know about all of these, however, there are some major categories that you should be familiar with.

For Week 1 we suggest you review mood disorders, noting that in the DSM V Depressive Disorders and Bipolar Disorders are no separate categories.

 

BLOG POSTS:

 

Psychiatric History Taking

A primer on psychiatric history taking for medical students and junior medical officers

0 comments

Asking the difficult questions in psychiatry

For a number of reasons there are some topics or questions that we find less easy to ask of our patients.

0 comments

Mood Disorders: A rollercoaster of emotions

Dr Sarah Hutton discusses Mood Disorders. Its fairly simple when you break it into sad and happy (or is it)?

2 comments

Can you get Serotonin Syndrome from a Cough Medicine?

0 comments

 

Week 1 Practice OSCE
Week 2

During week 2 we recommend you review the psychotic disorders.  This will also enable you to review mental health ethics and the Mental Health Act.

Key Learning Outcomes:

  1. Review Psychotic Disorders, in particular Schizophrenia
  2. Review Antipsychotic Medications, in particular their general mechanism of action and the types of side effects and safety issues
  3. Understand the Principle of Least Restrictive Care which underpins the majority of mental health legislation in the world
  4. Understand the two types of definitions of Mentally Ill and Mentally Disordered under the NSW Mental Health Act
  5. Practice “Formulating” your cases using the Biopsychosocial Model (this will help you in your presentations of cases)

 

BLOG POSTS:

 

The Mental Health Act

Keys aspects of the Mental Health Act for medical students and junior medical staff

0 comments

The Mental State Examination in Psychiatry

How to tackle phenomenology for the novice or intermediate learner

0 comments
psychosis

Psychosis

0 comments

 

Week 2 Practice Viva
Week 3

During this week we encourage you to review anxiety disorders and consider the role of psychological therapies and psychosocial treatments in the management of and recovery from mental illness.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Review the main anxiety disorders
  2. Try to interview at least one patient with an anxiety problem (hint about 80% patients with depression have an anxiety component)
  3. Review main treatments for anxiety disorders (e.g. psychological therapies & antidepressants, understand the limited role for benzodiazpines)
  4. Learn about mindfulness and sleep hygiene
  5. Practice presenting patients to members of your team

 

BLOG POSTS:

 

Anxiety: What’s the deal with it? Isn’t it normal to feel anxious?

In this blog Dr Sarah Hutton discusses the role that anxiety plays in everyone’s lives and when anxiety may become a problem.

0 comments

Psychological Therapies

Felicia Ng discusses the role of psychotherapies in psychiatry

0 comments

 

PRACTICE CASE FOR WEEK 3

Week 4

We are already halfway through our term and have covered quite a lot.

This week the focus is on culture and mental health.  Please bear in mind that part of your examination will include an assessment of your understanding of the role of culture in mental illness.  We will be utilising Aboriginal culture as our basis of understanding the role of culture in mental health.

You should also review development and personality, as well as eating disorders and risk.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Complete the RANZCP eLearning module on interviewing an Aboriginal person
  2. If possible interview an Aboriginal person in relation to their mental health and well being
  3. Review Personality Disorders, in particular Borderline Personality Disorder and Antisocial Personality Disorder
  4. Review Eating Disorders
  5. Review Risk Assessment
  6. Interview someone with either a Personality Disorder or Eating Disorder and consider the acute and long term risk factors
  7. Practice documenting patients the way you will be expected to document when you are an Intern, for e.g. assist with completing a discharge summary or file note

 

BLOG POSTS:

 

The Dance of Life by Helen Milroy

Culture & Psychiatry

0 comments

What is a personality disorder? The weird, the wild and the worried

Su Lynn Cheah discusses the main types of personality problems likely to be encountered by medical students as well as some interesting controversies.

0 comments

Communication in Psychiatry

Anthony discusses some of the important communications issues when working in Psychiatry

0 comments

Personality Disorders Part Deux: How to Assess, How to Manage

0 comments

 

Week 4 Practice Viva
Week 5

This is our final week of new learning.  Next week will be a consolidation and preparation week.

The focus this week is on conditions that are more likely to be seen by interns in the general hospital or general practice setting.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Review cognitive testing and delirium (note that the majority of patients with delirium are “quietly” confused)
  2. Perform cognitive testing on at leat one patient, for e.g. the MMSE or the MiniCOG or the MOCA and discuss your findings with someone
  3. Review somatizing disorders
  4. Practice performing a handover for a variety of scenarios using one of the standard formats for e.g. ISBAR

 

PRACTICE CASE – COMING SOON

 

BLOG POSTS:

doors

The Ds of Cognitive Impairment

Felicia Ng discusses the D’s of Cognitive Impairment (Delirium, Dementia and Depression) with a special emphasis on Delirium

0 comments
Weeks 6 & 7 and Final Thoughts

Congratulations on completing your Psychiatry Rotation.

We do hope that you have had a good experience and an opportunity to prepare yourself for internship next year.

Don’t forget to get your supervisor forms and logbooks completed and returned.

For those of you interested in knowing a bit more about what its like to be a psychiatrist here are a few links:

Psychiatry at NSW Health Map My Health Career

RANZCP: Why Choose Psychiatry as a Career?

Hunter New England JMO Training Page

 

BLOG POSTS:

 

How to study psychiatry? Some recommendations.

A few tips on how to study psychiatry in your final year from the coordinator of final year psychiatry at University of Newcastle.

4 comments

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